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THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 

194 1 




THE TATTLE R 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 

194 1 




(This issue nf the (Tattler hie ueiUrate to 

iMrs. l\ntmuntit j\. Ulanicr 

in appreciation nf her sixteen years of sernire as 
teacher, Jfnrensir sunnsnr, and loyal Erienb. 



THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chief, Russell BlSBEE '41 

Assistant Editors, Adelbert Roberge '41, Charles Bartlett '42 

Business Manager, Robert Newell '41 

Assistants, Ted Ames '41, Ralph Bates '41 

Alumni Editor, Doris Sincage '42 

Exchange Editor, June Bowker "41 

Sports Editors, Leo Dymerski '41, Rita Kulash '41 

Literary Editors, Eloise Bartlett '42, Jean Warner- '42 

Faculty Adviser, Margery Damon 



CONTENTS 



Dedication 

Senior Class 

Address of Welcome 

Class History 

Class Prophecy 

Prophecy on Prophetess 

Class Will 

Class Grinds 

Class Statistics 

Class of '42 

Class of '43 

Class of '44 

Editorials . 

Literary 

Tattler Staff 

Forensic Group . 

Pro Merito 

Baseball 

Basketball — Boys' 

Soccer 

Basketball — Girls' 

Alumni Notes 

Class Song 



i: 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

2" 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 





FREDERICK HORACE ALLEN 



Fred 



Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Operetta 2; Glee Club Concert 4: Christ- 
mas Party Committee 3, 4; Freshman Reception Committee 3; 
Junior Prom Committtee 3: Baseball 4. 

Ambition: aviator 
Hobby: stamp collecting 
Noted for: cooperative spirit 



EDWARD JAMES AMES 



"Ted' 



Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4: Co- 
Captain of Basketball 4; Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Treas- 
urer of Athletic Association 4; Junior Prom Committee 3: 
Home Room Council 1: Senior Card Party Committee 4: As- 
sistant Business Manager of Tattler 4; Quarterly Staff 2, 3, 4; 
Executive Committee of N. F. L. 3, 4; Forensic League 3, 4; 
Athletic Association Committee 3. 

Ambition: own a Kentucky Derby winner 

Hobby : horse races 

Noted for: Interest in sports 



RALPH EMERSON BATES 



'Dunk" 



Class Vice President 4; Baseball 3, 4: Basketball 3, 4: Soccer 
3, 4; Glee Club 2, 4; Operetta 2; Concert 4: Athletic Asso- 
ciation 3, 4: Secretary of A. A. 4; Quarterly Staff 4; Assistant 
Business Manager of Tattler 4; Quarterly Staff 2, 3, 4; Execu- 
tive Committee of N. F. L. 3, 4; Forensic League 3, 4; Ath- 
letic Association Committee 3. 

Ambition: sports' reporter 
Hobhy: athletics 
Noted for: dates 



RUSSELL TAYLOR BISBEE 



•Biz' 



Class President 1: Class Vice President 2: Class Secretary 3, 
4; Glee Club 4; Glee Club Concert 4: Pro Mcrito 3, 4: Presi- 
dent of Pro Merito 3, 4: Junior Prom Committee Chairman 3; 
Treasurer of N. F. L. 3; Vice President of N. F. L. 4: De- 
bating 3, 4: Senator to National Student Congress 4; Spectator 
Stall 3. 4: Editor-in-Chief of Tattler 4: Alumni Editor of 
Tattler 3: Class Oration 4: Co-Chairman of Forensic Food 
Sale 4: A. A. 2. 3: N. F. L. Key. 

Ambition: engineer 
Hobby: Stamp collecting 
Noted for: scholarship 



JUNE PACKARD BOWKER 



'Bowcus" 



Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice 
President of A. A. 4; Cheer Leader 4; Manager of Basketball 
4; Class Treasurer 1; Class Secretary 2; Home Room Council 
3; Operetta 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Pro Merito 3; Secretary and 
Treasurer of Pro Merito 3; Tattler Staff 4; Spectator Staff 4; 
Committee for Forensic Food Sale 4; Junior Prom Committee 
3; Glee Club Concert 4; Christmas Party Committee 3. 

Ambition: success 
Hobby: athletics 
Noted for: curls 




JOSEPHINE MARY CERPOVICZ 



'Josie" 



Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Operetta 2; Concert 4; Committee for 
Junior Card Party 3; Committee for Junior Prom 3; Pro 
Merito 3, 4; Committee for Senior Card Party 4; Class Sta- 
tistics 4. 

Ambition: success 
Hobby: dancing 
Noted for: smile 



RICHARD JAMES CULVER 



"Dick" 



Freshmen Reception Committee 3, 4; Christmas Party Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; Glee Club 4; Glee Club 
Concert 4; Baseball 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; Class Grinds 4. 

Ambition: aviator 
Hobby: collecting stones 
Noted for: good nature 



MARY ISABELLE DANIELS 



"Toots' 



Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Glee Club Concert 4: Pro Merito 3, 4: 
Junior Prom Committee 3; Operetta 2; Co-Chairman of Foren- 
sic Food Sale 3; Entrant in Pre-State and State Speech Tour- 
naments for Speech 4; Class History 4; Crowned "Miss Col- 
umbia" at Junior Prom 4. 

Ambition: secretary 
Hobby: stamp collecting 
Noted for: charm 






"*<* 




FAITH HEWES DRESSER 










'Fay" 



Glee Club 1, 2, 4: Operetta 2: Pro Merito 3, 4; Junior Prom 
Committee Chairman 3: Co-Chairman of Forensic Food Sale 
2. 1, 4; Entrant in Pre-State and State Speech Tournaments 3; 
Debating 4: Athletic Association 1: Christmas Party Commit' 
tee Chairman 3, 4: Secretary of N. F. L. 4: N. F. L. Key; 
Senior Movies 4; Prophecy on the Prophetess 4. 

Ambition: scientist 
Hobby: dancing 
Noted for: enthusiasm 



LEO JOSEPH DYMERSKI 



"Popeye" 



Basketball 3, 4: Baseball 2, 3, 4: Soccer 3, 4: Athletic Asso- 
ciation 1, 2, 3, 4: President of Athletic Association 4: Class 
President 2: Home Room Council 3: Glee Club 2: Operetta 
2: Junior Prom Committee 3; Quarterly Staff 3, 4: Tattler 
Staff 3: Freshman Reception Committee 3. 

Ambition: pilot 

Hobby: athletics 

Noted for: witty remarks 



DOROTHY FISHER 

Forensic League 3. 4: Athletic Association 3, 4. 

Ambition: secretary 
Hobby: dancing 
Noted for: willingness 



"Dot" 



CONSTANCE WINIFRED GRANGER 



"Connie" 



Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Operetta 2: Glee Club Concert 4 : Athletic 
Association 2, 3: Christmas Party Committee 3, 4: Junior 
Prom Committee 3; Freshman Reception Committee 4: Class 
Treasurer 4; Entrant in Pre-State and State Speech Tourna- 
ments 4; Senior Dance Committee 4. 

Ambition: happiness 
Hobby: dancing 
Noted for: versatility 



HAROLD FREDERICK HILLENBRAND 



Junior Prom Committee 3; Basketball 2, 3; Soccer 4 
Party Committee 3, 4; Christmas Party Committee 3, 4 

Ambition: to make money 
Hobby: swimming 
Noted for: slowness 



I oar 
Card 




GRACE HOPE JARVIS 



"Honey' 



Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Glee Club Operetta 2; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Junior Party Committee 3: Glee Club Concert 4: 
Senior Movies 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Senior Party Committee 
4; Athletic Association 1, 2, 3: Committee for Forensic Food 
Sale 3, 4. 

Ambition: travel 

Hobby: learning new facts 

Noted for: naiveness 



ROBERT FRANCIS KEARNEY "Jock" 

Athletic Association 2; Baseball 3; Junior Prom Committee 
3; Forensic Card Party Committee 3; Christmas Party Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Senior Card Party 4. 

Ambition: success 
Hobby: sports 
Noted for: blush 



FREDERICK ALLEN KING "Freddie" 

Basketball Manager 4; Soccer Manager 4; Prom Committee 3: 
Senior Card Party 4. 

Ambition: radio operator 

Hobby: radio 

Noted for: wasting time 




HENRY JOHN KOPKA 



"Hank- 



Glee Club 2: Operetta 2: Soccer 4: Baseball 4; Prom Com' 
mittee 3; Forensic Card Party Committee 3: Christmas Party 
Committee 3; Athletic Association 2. 

Ambition: sailor 
Hobby: athletics 
Noted for: modesty 



RITA MARY KULASH 



"Magee" 



Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4: Co-Captain of Basketball 4; Glee Club 2: 
Operetta 2: Pro Merito 3, 4: Committee for Forensic Card 
Party 3, 4: Class Will 4: Tattler Staff 4: Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3: Committee for Christmas Party 3: Committee for 
Senior Card Party 4. 

Ambition: stenographer 

Hobby: sports 

Noted for: long shots in basketball 



GERALD LARKIN 



Zip 



Glee Club 3: Forensic Card Party 3: Christmas Party 3. 4: 
Junior Prom 3: Soccer 3. 4: Captain of Soccer 3, 4; Basketball 
":. 3. 4 : Baseball 1. 2. 3. 4: Captain of Baseball 2. 4: Co- 
Captain of Basketball 4. 

Ambition: "big leaguer" 
Hobby: athletic- 
Noted fur : speed in driving 



Robert McAllister 



"Mac" 



Basketball 3, 4: Baseball 3: Soccer 3. 4: Glee Club 2. 3, 4; 
Junior Prom 3: Spectator Staff 2. 3: Quarterly Staff 4. 

Ambition: aviator 
Hobby: athletics 
Noted for: handwriting 



LUCIUS AUGUSTUS MERRITT, JR. "Lou" 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 2; Class President 3; Athletic 
Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4; General Cha-rman of 
Junior Prom 3; Freshman Reception Committee 4; Treasurer 
of Forensic League 4; Forensic League 3, 4; Debating 3, 4; 
Humorous Declamation 3, 4; Senator to National Student 
Congress 4; N. F. L. Degree of Excellence 4; School Orches- 
tra 4; Chairman of Senior Party and Dance 4. 

Ambition: own a horse farm 
Hobby: music 
Noted for: eloquence 



ESTHER LOUISE MOLLISON 



'Dixie" 



Glee Club 4; Glee Club Concert 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
Junior Party Committee 3; Senior Movies 4; Class Historian 
3, 4; Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Committee for Forensic 
Food Sale 3, 4. 

Ambition: travel 

Hobby: collecting banners 

Noted for: carefree manner 



ARLINE LIDA MINER 



"Frenchie" 



Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Operetta 2; Refreshment Committee for 
Junior Prom 3; President of N. F. L. 4; Pro Merito 3, 4: 
Vice-President of Pro Merito 4; D.A.R. Pilgrim 4; Class Ora- 
tion 4; Glee Club Concert 4; Freshman Reception Committee 
4; Entrant in Pre-State and State Speech Tournaments 3, 4; 
Chairman of Forensic Food Sale 3. 

Ambition: secretary 
Hobby: dancing 
Noted for: giggle 



ROBERT EVERETT NEWELL 



"Bob- 



Junior Prom Committee 3; Class President 4; Class Vice Pres- 
ident 3; Debating 3, 4; Entrant in Pre-State and State Speech 
Tournaments 3, 4; General Chairman of Christmas Party 3; 
Glee Club 4; Glee Club Concert 4; Basketball 4; Soccer 4; 
Baseball Manager 4; Freshman Reception Committee 4; Busi- 
ness Manager of Tattler 4; N. F. L. Key. 

Ambition: to make people happy 
Hobby: making friends 
Noted for: making noise 





ADELBERT JUSTIN ROBERGE 



"Buddy" 



Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Operetta 2; Glee Club Concert 4; Athletic 
Association 1, 2; Junior Prom Committee 3; Freshman Recep' 
tion Committee 4: Quarterly Staff 4; Tattler Staff. 

Ambition: success 
Hobby: dancing 
Noted for: dancing 



PHYLLIS MARGARET SUTHERLAND 



"Phyl" 



Glee Club 2; Junior Prom Committee 3: Pro Merito 4; Class 
Prophecy 4; Forensic Food Sale Committee 3. 

Ambition: secretary 
Hobby: knitting 
Noted for: soft voice 



JEANNETTE ELIZABETH WRIGHT 



"Nettie' 



Glee Club 1, 3, 4; Operetta 1: Basketball 2: Junior Party 
Committee 3; Junior Prom Committee 3: Glee Club Concert 
4: Quarterly Typist 4; Athletic Association 2. 

Ambition: to be happy 
Hobby: collecting match covers 
Noted for: sense of humor 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



11 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Class Historian 



Robert Newell 

Ralph Bates 

Russell Bisbee 

Constance Granger 

Esther Mollison 



CLASS NIGHT 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME 

CLASS HISTORY 

CLASS PROPHECY 

PROPHECY ON THE PROPHETESS 

CLASS WILL 

CLASS GRINDS 

CLASS STATISTICS 



Robert Newell 

Mary Daniels 

Phyllis Sutherland 

Faith Dresser 

Rita Kulash 

Richard Culver 

Josephine Cerpovicz 



GRADUATION NIGHT ORATIONS 



Tomorrow's World 
The American Spirit 



Lida Miner 
Russell Bisbee 



CLASS MOTTO— Strive for the Highest 
CLASS GIFT— State Flag and Standard 



SENIOR CLASS 



Frederick Allen 
Edward Ames 
Ralph Bates 
Russell Bisbee** 
June Bowker 
Josephine Cerpovicz* 
Richard Culver* 
Mary Daniels* 
Faith Dresser* 
Leo Dymerski 
Dorothy Fisher 
Constance Granger 
Harold Hillenbrand 

*Pro Merito 



Jeanette Wright 



Hope Jarvis 

Robert Kearney 

Frederick King 

Henry Kopka 

*Rita Kulash 

Gerald Larkin 

Robert McAllister 

Lucius Merritt 

Esther Mollison 

*Lida Miner 

Robert Newell 

Adelbert Roberge 

*Phyllis Sutherland 

**High Honor 



12 



THE TATTLER 



Address of Welcome 



The members of the Class of 1941 and I are 
happy to welcome all parents, teachers and 
friends to our graduation exercises — our first di' 
rect step toward the commencement of a new 
life. Your interest and support for the past four 
years enables us to take with us pleasant memo- 



ries of association, knowledge, and experience. 

"To Strive for the Highest" is our motto and 
we look forward to making it a reality in our 
lives. We sincerely hope you enjoy our Class 
Night program. 

Robert Newell 



Class History 



September 7, 1937 was the first day of high 
school for about fifty gay, laughing, freshmen. 
We went to school only half a day. We were 
assigned a room, a desk, made out our schedules 
and met our home room teacher. 

After we had been there a few weeks Ruth 
Black, the senior class president, assisted us in 
conducting our first class meeting. Our class of- 
ficers were: President, Russell Bisbee; Vice Presi- 
dent, Wellington Graves; Secretary, Marjorie 
Payson; Treasurer, June Bowker. 

After we had become acquainted with some 
of our classmates, teachers and the other stu- 
dents, the upperclassmen began filling us with 
fear and horror of the approaching Freshman 
Reception. What made it worse was the fact 
it was postponed for a short time because of the 
new addition being put on the school building. 
The reception was held the night of October 21 
in the Town Hall. Fortunately for us the seniors, 
remembering their dread of the event four years 
previous let us off easily and gave us a good time. 

The remainder of the year was spent in get- 
ting used to our new surroundings and trying to 
make a good impression on the teachers. 

In September 1938 forty of us returned. We 
had lost a number of our old classmates but a 
few new faces had joined us. This year we felt 
at home as we climbed the stairs and walked 
down the hall to our new class room. 

Leo Dymcrski was elected President: Russell 
Bisbee, Vice President; June Bowker, Secretary; 
and Dorothy Baker, Treasurer. 

The Operetta, given by the combined Glee 
Clubs, was one of the high lights during our 
sophomore year. Of course it meant a great deal 
of work and practice but I doubt if there is any 
one who can say they didn't enjoy taking part. 

The Junior year Lucius Mcrritt was elected 



President: Robert Newell, Vice President; Rus- 
sell Bisbee, Secretary: and Faith Dresser, Treas- 
urer. 

Our Rainbow Prom which was given in honor 
of the Seniors and Alumni was the first success- 
ful one in quite a few years. The whole class 
feels certain that without the wonderful help 
and cooperation of Mrs. Warner the prom would 
not have been such a success. 

The Fall of 1940 finally came and we certainly 
had a grand time initiating the freshmen. We 
really weren't too hard on them and succeeded 
in giving them a good time. 

Robert Newell was Class President: Ralph 
Bates, Vice President; Russell Bisbee, Secretary: 
and Constance Granger, Treasurer. 

The seniors were quite outstanding in The 
Forensic League. Lucius Merritt was awarded 
the blue sapphire key which is given to any stu- 
dent who has over 100 points. Constance Gran- 
ger, Lida Miner and Mary Daniels also took part 
in the speech tournament. We were honored by 
having two of our seniors, Russell Bisbee and 
Lucius Merritt, elected to go to Kentucky as the 
two senators representing New England. 

Our Basketball players will not be forgotten 
for some time. For three years in a row the sen- 
iors have participated in the Small Tournament 
at Mass. State. This year, however, they were 
defeated by North Brookfield for the first time 
in the tournament. 

In contrast with last year, the juniors gave an 
"Old Glory" prom. It was a patriotic dance 
which included the crowning of Columbia. 

And now that June has come and we are 
ready to receive our dipolmas we feel that it has 
not only been a worth while, but also a very en- 
joyable four years. 

Mary Daniels 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



13 



Class Prophecy 



Science is a truly wonderful thing, I thought 
to myself, as I relaxed in the soft plush-lining 
of my chair in the luxurious "Mercury Line" 
rocket ship, and adjusted my sun glasses to a 
more comfortable angle. My Morpheus-laden 
eyes fell on a calendar, mounted on the chair 
in front of me — the date — June 17, 1980. June 
17, that date was strangely familiar — of course, 
on June 17, 1941, the Senior Class of Williams- 
burg High School, made their last informal bow 
to the public, before taking official leave at grad- 
uation exercises the next evening. Softly I 
sighed, as I reminisced on those 39 years that 
had passed into eternity since we were high 
school Seniors. How I wondered what lots had 
befallen my classmates of that year, long past. 
And now I was on my way, of all places, to the 
moon. 

I remember the day that the moon was first 
reached. A New England scientist, by the name 
of EDWARD AMES, reached the planet, and 
successfully made a landing in his rocket ship. 
This was about five years ago now, for it hap- 
pened in 1975. 

I was awakened from my state of semi-con- 
sciousness by the feeling of a hand on my shoul- 
der, and turned to see a tall, middle-aged man, 
with a conductor's hat, requesting my ticket. I 
reached in my purse, and handed him the cre- 
dentials. It was then that I got a full view of 
his face. "Why HENRY KOPKA," I said with 
a start, "what are you doing working on a rocket 
ship?" "Oh, well," murmured Henry, "I always 
wanted to travel, and this seemed like a good 
way to do it, without paying every time." Henry 
and I chatted for a time, and I was very much 
surprised to learn that another one of my former 
classmates was also employed by the "Mercury 
Line."— BUDDY ROBERGE, who had signed 
on some years ago as chief chef. "You will prob- 
ably get a chance to see him, too, for he comes 
around every noon-hour, with his little gong, to 
announce that dinner is served," said Henry. 

Before long I heard bells ringing and voices 
shouting, "The Moon. All out." The long sleek 
ship swished into a green-cheese landing field, 
and came abruptly to a halt. As the gang-plank 
was lowered, I got my first glance at this new 
planet, and the first face that greeted me, was 
one old and familiar— FRED ALLEN. "Get 
your mouse-skin umbrellas here," sang Fred, in 
the voice of a circus barker, "and be protected 



against the green-cheese rains." "Fred Allen, 
what are you doing here, and selling, of all 
things, mouse-skin umbrellas?" "Well the 
W.P.A. folded up on earth, so I took to the 
moon. It's a great place, but the women are 
sort of cheesey" — same old Fred, still cracking 
the same old jokes. "Carry your bags, ma'm," 
said a voice at my left, "Extra special service at 
the lowest rates — nothing but the best for those 
who patronize 'Bates Bag Company'." "Say, 
what is this — a class reunion?" — I muttered, as 
I shook hands with RALPH BATES. "I've 
only been on this planet for a few minutes, and 
already I've met a gang of Burgy High graduates. 
Well, they always said that the sky was the limit 
for that class, and it looks as though it were 
the truth." 

"You haven't seen the half of it yet," muttered 
Ralph. "We usually aren't too courteous to 
strangers here, but you're in luck. You see, many 
of your classmates are right up here." 
I strolled to a corner of the landing field, and 
there I saw three or four of the strangest-looking 
vehicles that I have ever laid eyes on. It was 
not until a short, meek-voiced little man shouted, 
"Taxi?" that I knew what they were. The con- 
traptions somewhat resembled baby carriages, ex- 
cept for the fact that the wheels were not round, 
as we use on earth, but square — and the most 
amazing of all, my taxi-driver turned out to be 
none other than that quiet chap — RICHARD 
CULVER. Salutations were again in order, and 
as I rode toward a hotel that my driver had 
recommended, I questioned Dick as to his past 
life, and also as to the quaint custom of using 
square wheels. "Well, it's like this. When I first 
came to the moon, a serious unemployment prob- 
lem existed — now I hit on a way of solving this 
problem. If it is an easy way to make a thing 
go with round wheels; then, but putting on 
square wheels, it makes the work hard; therefore 
it makes more work — therefore there's no unem- 
ployment problem." I looked at my former 
classmate with astonishment — then I remembered 
how Richard was always able to solve our prob- 
lems in high school. "Well, it sure sounded like 
a good idea last night," said Dick, "but maybe 
HAROLD HILLENBRAND and I stayed out 
too late at that party down to FAITH DRES- 
SER'S and DOT FISHER'S. The trouble with 
Faith's parties are that she won't let the fellows 
go home before dawn, because then she can 



14 



THE TATTLER 






make them stay and milk the cows. She and Dot 
are managing a dairy farm, you know." 

The taxi stopped with a jolt, and down on 
his knees went my driver, Dick. "What's the 
matter?" I cried. "Get out and bow down, their 
majesties the king and queen approach. "The 
blare of trumpets sounded in the street, and 
mounted on a white kangaroo, with his wife rid' 
ing in the rumble seat, came the king of the 
moon. My surprise was uncontrollable, and I 
shouted out loud "RUSSELL BISBEE— JEAN- 
NETTE WRIGHT— you two old imposters, 
what do you think you're doing with all this 
pomp and ceremony?" His majesty, with a look 
of scorn, as if anyone in his kingdom would 
dare be so insubordinate, turned his head slight' 
ly in the direction of my voice, while her high' 
ness simply raised her nose higher in the air. 
"Why PHYLLIS SUTHERLAND," King Rus- 
sell shouted, and disregarding his kangaroo, and 
all the trimmings, leaped to my side, and shook 
hands. "Well you could knock me down with 
a fender," said Russell. "Jeannette, come here to 
see whom I've found." 

It was later the same day, and I was begin- 
ning to wonder who the queen of the moon 
really was, Jeannette, or myself, for I was seated 
in the middle of more ambassadors and high offi- 
cials of the moon, than it had ever been my privi- 
lege to witness while on earth. The hall was a 
large one, and the entire structure was made of 
candy cane sticks, while the meal before me was 
served on lollypops. On my left, was his majesty, 
King Russell; on my right, the queen, Jeannette. 
Two places down from the king sat the minister 
of state, none other than my former classmate, 
ROBERT NEWELL, who was smoking a large 
candy cigar. On a large floor, made entirely of 
rock candy, Miss LIDA MINER led her group 
of three little "Moonbeams", who were in reality 
JOSEPHINE CERPOVICZ, ESTHER MOLLI- 
SON, and RITA KULAS, in the dance of the 
"Chocolate Soldiers", which proved to be, to say 
the least, very amusing. About this time, I was 
beginning to think that every one of my class- 
mates of 1941 had taken up residence on the 
moon, but I was informed differently by the 
court jester, LEO DYMERSKI, who in the midst 
of his act of juggling three pieces of green cheese 



while standing on his head, told me that ROB- 
ERT KEARNEY, who was the palace night- 
watchman for quite a few years, had one night 
gone too close to the edge of the moon and 
fallen off: he had probably landed on a cloud 
somewhere. "Bobbie doesn't live here any more," 
said Leo. 

Following the banquet, I was invited to the 
nursery by Queen Jeannette, to see her twin 
sons. The cute little darlings were almost asleep 
in the arms of governess, MARY DANIELS, 
who was singing softly, "Go to sleep my little 
buckaroos." I shook hands with Mary, and was 
glad to learn that she had finally fulfilled her 
ambition of taking care of children. 

The next morning the sun shone brightly on 
the moon, and bag and baggage, I stood by the 
side of the "Eclipse", another "Mercury Line" 
rocket ship, that was to take me back to earth. 
I was thinking how much I had enjoyed my trip 
when an incoming rocket ship practically swept 
me off my feet as it skidded in to a three-point 
landing. As the passengers disembarged, the 
first to greet me were CONNIE GRANGER, 
HOPE JARVIS, and JUNE BOWKER. Hope 
and June were accompanied by their husbands, 
BOBBY MCALLISTER, and FRED KING, re- 
spectively. I was sorry to have time for only a 
short chat with my former classmates, who had 
been shopping down at Mars, but as I boarded 
my waiting rocket ship, I promised to come again 
soon. 

As the last glimpse of the moon faded from 
view, I turned to gazing through the port-hole 
window of the "Eclipse". I wouldn't see my 
former classmates for some time I thought, but 
there, I was definitely wrong, for as we sped past 
a small cloud-like island, I caught a glimpse of 
two men standing by a large sign that read 
"LARKIN and MERRITT— Dealers in Real 
Estate." A slogan under the heading read as 
follows: "Don't build your home on the crowded 
moon, come down here and have plenty of 
room." 

Unfortunately I have never had the opportun- 
ity of returning to the moon for another visit, 
but on many a cold winter evening, as I sit by 
the fire, I dream of those days in the strato- 
sphere that I spent with the Class of 1941. 



Prophecy of the Prophetess 



One day in June, 1960, I decided to visit my 
gister on Saturn. By catching the early space ship, 



Blue Fire, I could get there by noon. As I sat 
reading in one of the comfortable chairs in the 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



15 



cabin, a trim stewardess came down the aisle. 
Quietly she informed us that the pilot was male 
ing a landing on Jupiter for repairs and that 
there would be a delay of several hours. I had 
never before been able to stop at this planet for 
any length of time so I decided to explore. Pulling 
on my Space Eliminator Boots, more generally 
known as "Jiffies", I set out. I had covered only 
a few hundred miles when I spied a giantess 
bearing swiftly down on me. Perhaps this was 
a native who could tell me points of interest. 
When she approached to within speaking dis- 
tance, timidly I shouted up to her head which 
towered above me even as the redwoods of my 
native land. Surprisingly her voice when it came 
was as soft and gentle as if she were my size. 
Then I realized what she had said. "Why, Faith 
Dresser! What are you doing here?" Goodness 
me! Who on Jupiter could possibly know me? 
I stared up at her face. It did look familiar but 
I knew no giantess. Shades of Burgy High 
School! She looked just like my old classmate, 
PHYLLIS SUTHERLAND. Then she ex- 
claimed, "Don't you remember your old friend, 
Phyllis?" 

"Yes'S'S, but you can't be she!" I stammered, 
puzzled. Sinking to a rock I stared up at her 
astonished. 

"I am though, Oh, I see! My height! That'll 
wear off." 

She saw my perplexity, so reaching into her 
pocket she took out a white pill and swallowed 
it. 



"That will fix things." 

Sure enough. Soon she was my size. I felt as 
though I were dreaming and asked her to explain. 

"Well," she answered, sitting down beside me, 
"My husband, Al, is a scientist and I am his 
favorite 'guinea pig'. Just now he's experiment' 
ing on growth and shrinking through quick glan- 
dular feeding. Why last week he had me six 
inches high. This week I frighten everybody. I 
even have to have special clothes made of a secret 
elastic substance." 

"You certainly must have an exciting life," 
I said breathlessly. 

"Exciting. That isn't all." Springing to her 
feet with a light kindling in her eyes she started 
off on what evidently was her favorite topic. 
"Look as the unestimateable value it will have in 
the next war. As giants we can terrify and de- 
stroy. Your space ship would crush as easily 
between our fingers as an egg shell between yours. 
Then if the balance of victory tipped the other 
way we could be transformed in an instant to the 
size of grasshoppers. We will be unconquerable." 

I sat still, stunned by the possibilities. Laugh- 
ingly Phyllis sat down again and dismissing the 
subject from her mind talked of old times. 

After reminiscing for a time, I happened to 
glance at my watch. It was nearly time for the 
ship to renew its journey so I wished Phyllis 
and her scientist husband luck and returned to 
the "Blue Fire". 

Faith Dresser 



Class Will 



The Class of 1941 takes pleasure in present- 
ing to you this evening the last will of the senior 
class. We are about to leave the Williamsburg 
High School; but before leaving we should like to 
bequeath our treasures and our most precious 
possessions. 

To the faculty as a whole we leave our sincere 
thanks for everything they have taught us in 
the past four years. 

To Mr. Merritt we will a bell that we would 
like to have him ring when coming through the 
halls so that we will have a little warning as to 
who it is. 

Miss Dunphy is left a pile of lumber to con- 
struct a private room downstairs where the noise 
from changing classes will not forever interrupt 
her office sessions. 

To Mrs. Warner, who leaves us this year, we 



express our sincere wishes for a happy future. 

To Miss Damon we leave our twenty-six mis- 
used English books hoping next year's class will 
use them better than we. 

To Mr. Foster we leave a case of pencils so 
that he won't have to run to the office for pencils 
he wants to let someone borrow. 

Mr. Walker is left a book of discussion topics 
for his next year's stenography class. 

To Mr. Mullaly we leave a messenger to let 
him know when its time to ring the bells. 

Lida Miner, Phyllis Sutherland, and Mary 
Daniels leave their places at Hatfield dances to 
Doris Sincage, Lena Guyette, and Betty Allaire. 

Lucius Merritt and Fred Allen leave their 
trips to Goshen to anyone who thinks he could 
make these trips as regularly as they did. 

Josephine Cerpovicz wishes to leave her quiet 



16 



THE TATTLER 



ways to Cecilia Soltys. 

To Bobby Toski, Leo Dymerski wills his nu- 
merous trips to South Street. 

Mickey Batura is left Russell Bisbee's place 
as an honor student. 

Jerry Larkin leaves his ambition to enter the 
Big League to anyone who has as much ability 
as he. 

Jeannette Wright leaves her seat in English 4 
class to anyone who thinks she will enjoy it more 
than she has. 

Bob Newell and Buddy Roberge leave their 
flirtatious ways to Justin Stone and Norman 
Bates. 

Harold Hillenbrand leaves his possession of 
being late for school to Alfred Judd. We hope 
you won't use it too often. 

Henry Kopka and Bob Kearney leave their 
quietness to George Packard and Howard 
O'Brien. 

Ted Ames leaves his athletic ability to anyone 
who can fill his place. 

Bob McAllister leaves his place in the Lab' 
oratory to anyone in next year's class who would 
like to spend as much time there as he has. 

Fred King leaves his boisterous ways to John 



Polwrek. Fred thinks John is a little too quiet. 

Richard Culver leaves his poetic ability to 
George Molloy. We hope that you make a good 
poet, George. 

June Bowker leaves the name Ted to Edith 
Kasson while Ralph Bates leaves the name Caro- 
lyn to Roger King. 

To Phyllis Granger, Dorothy Fisher leaves 20 
pounds of her weight. 

Hope Jarvis, Esther Mollison, Connie Granger, 
and Faith Dresser leave their respective seats to 
Victoria Michaloski, Mavis Wickland, John Bar- 
rus, and Wilbur Shumway. 

Since we have willed our most precious ob- 
jects to the underclassmen we close this last will 
and testament given at the Auditorium of Wil- 
liamsburg High School this seventeenth day of 
June. 

Witnesses: 

Donald Duck 
Ferdinand 

and all the interested members of 
Williamsburg High School. 
Signed, The Class of 1941 

Rita Kulash 



Class Grinds 



To strive for the highest 
Is the Seniors' aim. 
But don't try to bluff, 
The teachers are game. 

Our class is an angel 
Whose wings are of wood: 
And here are the facts 
Of our students so good. 

Let's start with Bob Newell 
Our class president: 
Who to our class 
His hand has lent. 

Then there is Romeo; 
Ralph Bates as you know: 
Whose technique is bound 
To make him a beau. 

Next is Russell Bisbee, 
High honor classmate; 
Who is high in studies 
And also sedate. 

Of course there is Connie, 
Who asks for our dues; 



Just leave it to her 

To spread all the news. 

Let's travel to Goshen 
Where Esther is seen, 
Writing the history 
Of our class serene. 

Lida Miner comes next, 
Our spry office girl. 
Gets her work done quickly 
Then goes for a whirl. 

A quiet young girl 
From Chesterfield Hill — ■ 
Phyllis Sutherland 
Who seldom is ill. 

Our bluffer comes next 
Full of great spirit. 
We can now present 
Gay Lucius Mcrritt. 

There is Mary Daniels 
A pretty young lass 
Who is full of fun 
At her dancing class. 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



17 



How does Henry Kopka, 
Our most bashful lad 
Ever remember 
His small writing pad. 

Then Leo Dymerski 
A good athlete 
Seems fond of Burgy 
Could it be South Street? 

The classmate with least speed 
Harold Hillenbrand, 
Is quite smart indeed 
Should he wish to grind. 

The best girl athlete 
Is Rita Kulash, 
She can do her work 
In just a flash. 

The man from the mountain 
With street on the end 
Fred Allen's the man 
Who likes money to spend. 

Want your lawns mowed? 
Just hire Bob Kearney. 
It's one of his tricks; 
He says it's easy. 

When you're a Chemist, Faith, 
Remember that day 
When you turned on the hood 
To drive the smell away. 

To be a flyer, Hope, 
Just study the rules. 
And do your best 
At the flying schools. 

Let's call on June Bowker 
A tender young maid 
Who will be a nurse 
And come to our aid. 



A future big leaguer 
Is our Edward Ames, 
Who doesn't get riled 
When he is called names. 

Our Worthington student 
Who seems to be wise; 
Jeannette doesn't come here 
With any disguise. 

Hark! the radio goes, 
Listen to Freddie; 
He's King as you know, 
And is always ready. 

Then down to Haydenville 
To call on our "Mac"; 
He is always there 
With a good wise crack. 

Jerry gives us some fun 
When he makes the Ford 
Bump along the street 
That's as rough as a board. 

Next on our roll call — 
Roberge, our store clerk, 
Says, "What will you have?" 
As he must not shirk. 

Let's pick on Dot Fisher 
A charming young girl; 
Who says that dancing 
Gives her a real thrill. 

Being the last Senior 
I join my own game 
And now pass forward 
Richard Culver's name. 

To strive for the highest 

Is the Senior aim. 

We shall try to follow it. 

Whatever our game. Richard Culver 



Class Statistics 



Prettiest Girl June Bowker 

Handsomest Boy Edward Ames 

Most Popular Girls 

Constance Granger and Lida Miner 
Most Popular Boy Leo Dymerski 

Best Girl Dancers 

Faith Dresser and Dorothy Fisher 
Best Boy Dancer Adelbert Roberge 

Best Dressed Girl June Bowker 

Best Dressed Boy Edward Ames 



Class Wits 



Lucius Merritt and Robert Newell 



Smartest Girl 
Smartest Boy 
Best Girl Athlete 
Best Boy Athlete 
Best All Around Girl 
Best All Around Boy 
Quietest Student 
Class Poet 

(Continued 



Josephine Cerpovicz 

Russell Bisbee 

Rita Kulash 

Leo Dymerski 

Connie Granger 

Russell Bisbee 

Josephine Cerpovicz 

Richard Culver 

on Page 35) 



18 



THE TATTLER 




Front row — Emelia Kolosevvicz, Thelma Packard, Ruth Beebe, Doris Sincage, Harry Warner, 

Jean Warner, Josephine Ozierinski, Cecelia Soltys. 
Second row — Mary Kellogg, Doris Dymerski, Lena Guyette, Victoria Michaloski, Margaret Stone. 

Sylvia Clary, Audrey Jones, Dorothy Stimson, Elizabeth Allaire. 
Third row — Mavis Wickland, John Pavelcsyk, Charles Bartlett, John Barrus, Michael Batura. 
Ab.sent — Eloise Bartlett, Wilbur Shumvvay, David West. 



Class of 1942 



JUNIORS 
President: Harry Warner 
Vice President: Doris Sincagc 
Secretary: Jean Warner 
Treasurer.- Ruth Bccbc 
Class Historian: Thelma Packard 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



19 




Front row — Geneva Graves, Arlene Sabo, Mary Bowker, Betty Damon, Jean Crone, Millard 

Hathaway, John O'Brien, Charlotte Otis, Mildred Shaw, Ruth Carver, Eleanor Rhoades, 

Marguerite Pomeroy, Marion Culver, Shirley Knight. 
Second row — Carolyn Emerson, Helen Carver, Joyce Mason, Bernice Golash, Ruth Sanderson, 

Norma Wells, June Colburn, Irene Metz, Frostine Graves, Bette Harlow, Mary Noyes, Edna 

Shaw, Lorena Nietsche. 
Third row — George Molloy, Frank Munson, Donald Wickland, Lester Shaw, William Bisbee, 

Roger King, Robert Edwards. 
Fourth row — Joseph Haigh, Robert Munson, Edward Golash, Donald Campbell, Lucius Jenkins. 
Absent — Warren Brisbois, Francis Demerski, Leo Stone. 



Class of 1943 



SOPHOMORES 
President: Jack O'Brien 
Vice President: Charlotte Otis 
Secretary: Millard Hathaway 
Treasurer: Jean Crone 
Class Historian: Mildred Shaw 



20 



THE TATTLER 




Front row — Charlotte Brooks, Winona Mathers, Ruth Munson, Marion Warner, George Packard, 

Robert Algustoski, Margaret Ryan, James McAllister. 
Second row — Margaret Johnson, Pauline Cote, Elsa Lloyd, Phyllis Granger, Marion Sylvester, 

Clarice Graves, Agnes Matrishon, Harlan Nye, Alfred Judd, Frederick Roth. 
Third row — Edward Sincage, Waldemar Kolosewicz, Thomas Algustoski, Edith Allen, Edith 

Kasson, Eleanor Eddy, Justin Stone, Merton Nye, Rene Desmarais. 
Fourth row — Norman Bates, Francis O'Brien, Karl Hillenbrand, Howard O'Brien, John Polwrek. 



Class of 1944 



FRESHMAN 
President: George Packard 
Vice President: Robert Morin 
Secretary: Marion Warner 
Treasurer: Robert Algustoski 
Class Historian ■ Margaret Ryan 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



21 



Editorials 



EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

While in school every student should partici' 
pate in some activity outside of his regular school 
work. This may surprise some but nevertheless 
it is true. Of course studies come first and should 
have the first consideration, for after all that is 
the primary purpose of high school. But your 
high school days will mean much more to you if 
you have enjoyed some extra-curricular activity. 
The people who dislike school are those who 
never go out for sports or debating or other ac- 
tivities. They have missed one of the greatest 
opportunities offered to high school students. 

Take sports, for instance. The boy who goes 
out for basketball or baseball will always remem- 
ber the ball games he was in, and they will stand 
out as the high light in his high school days. Far 
better than that, though, he will learn good 
sportsmanship and the thrill of interscholastic 
competition. Also he will go out to other schools 
and meet other students and from them learn 
about the life of his neighbors. These experi- 
ences could never be gained by books and classes. 

Speech work also offers opportunities along 
these same lines which could not be gained by 
just going to school. Through its participation 
you go to other schools and become acquainted 
with people from other districts. Not only do 
you get practice in speaking before audiences 
but you also, through debating, become mentally 
alert and quick to reason. 

Only through these extra-curricular activities 
can such benefits be obtained. Naturally, these 
additional activities mean additional work but 
the experience gained will more than repay you. 
After graduation when you begin to look back 
at your high school days classes will not be re- 
membered, but a thrilling ball game or an ex- 
citing debate will come first into your mind. So 
get out into things and do something that is not 
on the schedule; you'll never regret it. 

Russell Bisbee, '41 



TEMPTATIONS OF YOUTH 

What is happening to the youth of today? 
For the past decade bar rooms and cheap dance 
halls, selling liquors, have been springing up all 
over the country. These places are troublesome, 
for young people of high school age frequenting 



them. Parents do not realize — or do not wish to 
see it in their own children — but boys and girls 
of this age or under are visiting such places in- 
stead of finding a more useful pastime. They see 
gambling, drinking, fighting, and think it is even 
smart. This ever leads to theft, and the young 
people are in serious trouble with the law. 

Parents in each community should provide a 
community house as a recreational center for 
their children. Some towns have what are known 
as soft-drink cocktail bars. They have a piano, 
a phonograph, a radio and a good floor for 
dancing. Soft drinks and wholesome snacks may 
be bought. They have restful chairs and a small 
library of good books. The children can drop in 
at any hour of the day and enjoy themselves. If 
this type of place were as common as the bar 
rooms, they would help to build a more whole- 
some community. 

Eloise Bartlett, '42 

THE WAY TO BE GENEROUS 

If we were asked the meaning of "generous", 
we might say it was being just the opposite of 
"selfish." A generous person shares his good 
things with others, thereby finding happiness for 
himself. So many of us do not have gifts to give 
people, but we do not have to be selfish. Selfish- 
ness is a state of mind, a way of thinking as well 
as of acting. The person who is interested only 
in his own affairs, who shows no interest or 
sympathy in the troubles of others, is very selfish, 
even though he may appear generous with his 
material things. 

Even though you have no gifts to offer, you 
can be generous by being kind and considerate 
of others. We all have our time, our sympathy, 
our courtesy, our friendliness, and our cheer. 
We can be generous and give these things to 
others. 

This is a day when the world needs a helping 
hand. From the war-torn countries across the 
waters many refugee children come to America. 
To help these unfortunate children should be 
counted a privilege, but it is not always money 
that can supply the greatest need. Many of these 
children need friendliness and good cheer more 
than they need money. We can be generous 
with these gifts. 

Jean Warner, '42 



:: 



THE TATTLER 



Literary 



CONTRAST 

The sun is shining brightly 
For spring is in the air. 
The sound of children's voices 
Ring out from everywhere. 

So peaceful is the landscape 
That nature rules supreme, 
Flowers and trees, grass and ferns 
Put on their brightest green. 

In city and in village 
Throughout this land of ours 
Men go about their business, 
Respecting other's powers. 

They live together calmly 
Without a thought of war, 
Which is the very reason 
Why we have gone so far. 

The sun shines not so brightly 
Across the ocean fair 
'Though spring is also coming 
It finds no welcome there. 

The children are so quiet 
And men think not of love, 
For cannons break the silence 
And bombs fall from above. 

The landscape is not peaceful. 
Destruction rules supreme, 
Great armies meet in combat 
And death completes the scheme. 

We find not happy living 
Through cannon or through gun, 
But just through peace and nature 
Will such a life be won. 



Russell Bisbee '41 



THAT MONGREL OF MINE 

Who is glad when I come home at night 

When my day down at school just wouldn't go 
right.' 

Who with his cute little tricks, tries hard to be- 
guile' 1 

Who muzzles my hand, and who makes me smile? 

Who kisses my cheek and jumps up and down 1 
Who, when I pat him, wags his tail round and 
round? 



And who when I don't feel too well, seems to 
say 

"C'mon, mistress mine, you're not quitting to- 
day"? 

It's my dog. 

Joyce Mason '4 3 

THE MAN WITH THE STRAWBERRY 
NOSE 

Have you seen the man with the strawberry nose, 
As he toddles his way through the street? 
He is homely and worn, as if torn by a storm 
But he's the nicest a person could meet. 

He's somebody's dad, this man with the nose, 
That is long and red as a beet. 
But somehow the old folks don't notice his nose 
As he toddles along down the street. 

There is never a day when he passes this way 
That he hasn't a cheery "Hello". 
And stops for a while, with that ear to ear smile 
To talk with his Italian friend, Joe. 

The children make fun of this man of the streets 
But that's something I'll never know why. 
Though he's homely and worn, as if torn by a 

storm 
He's sure to make Heaven in the sky. 

Bette Harlow '4 3 

MOTHER: 

One night as I lay sleeping 

There came a dream to me, 
I saw myself (a) weepiny 

As plainly as could be. 

Just why I was weeping 

I could not understand, 
Unless 'twas the thought of mother 

For I saw here near at hand. 

Mother! Yes, that is what I call her 

And that's the name that rules the earth, 

She's the star that has guided my footsteps 
From the moment of my birth. 

It's mother who counts the moments when 

From her hand I soon shall part 
But I will carry with me always, 

The blessings of her heart. 

Jean Warner '4 2 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



23 



SCHOOL 

You wake up in the morning 
Feeling worse than dead, 
Then with moans and groans, 
Drag yourself from bed. 

You swallow your breakfast in a gulp, 
For fear you'll miss your bus; 
If this occurs of course you'll walk 
You're ten minutes late, and you cus. 

You walk into your first class late 
With your face as red as a beet, 
Your marred old desk welcomes you — but, 
Look out, there's a tack in your seat. 

You didn't do the originals 
'Cause you were on a double date. 
In history class you flunk a quiz, 
And the Gallic War you hate. 

Down the stairs headfirst you plunge, 
You're clumsy as a mule. 
But, folks, please don't take us wrong, 
For we're very fond of school. 

Edna Shaw '43 

TRIXIE THE DOG AND PETER THE CAT 
We have a little Spitz dog, 
She's white as white can be, 
With not a speck of black on her, 
And never has a flee. 

She never used to like to eat, 
Until the cat arrived. 
And now it seems impossible, 
That she could have survived. 

And what do you think has happened? 
Now she has grown so fat, 
Simply because she's jealous 
Of our new black tommy cat. 

There the dog lies quietly sleeping, 
When in come four little feet, 
To disturb the dog from getting 
Her proper bit of sleep. 

They have a long, hard tussel, 
Play hide and seek and race, 
Just as little children do 
'Til we put them in their place. 

When off to bed the two must go, 
Where they will stay 'til morn' 
When new milk comes back from the farm 
And their new day is born. 

Frostine Graves '43 



THE MAPLE TREE 
The stars shone down on a scarred old maple 
tree which grew bravely at the end of the little 
village street. It was an old tree — very old — cov- 
ered with lover's and friend's initials. Each of 
which held a certain memory for the old tree. 



The old tree sighed gently, and shook its 
leaves back at the twinkling stars — rather absent' 
mindedly, I'm afraid — for tonight was a night 
for memories, and the old tree was very busy 
soliloquizing. Those initials — there where the 
first big branch crops out from the trunk — those 
initials — nearly obliterated by age — were carved 
many a long year ago by two young lovers. 

"Ah!" sighed the maple tree, "I can't seem to 
remember what they looked like, but how clearly 
I can recall what they said. Poor young things; 
they were homesick for a place called England. 
Strange, I'd never heard of that place then, but 
they came so often after the first night and 
talked, that I began to feel that I'd known the 
place all my life. And that tree, that old tree 
by the lane, where they used to meet; why, I 
was old friends with that tree. A beautiful thing 
it was; they said I reminded them of it. Well, 
its been a long time since they've come now, and 
even their little children, who used to play in 
my shade, are all gone. Only one great grandson 
and his wife are left." 

"What's this? Oh, yes, the two little English 
refugee children the great grandson took in. 
Odd, what just an old tree can hear. I knew 
all about the war in England. I found out by 
listening carefully. Do you see those fresh carved 
initials way down there in my trunk, not far 
from the ground? The little boy carved those 
last night when he came here with the little girl. 
I listened to them carefully because they re- 
minded me of my old friends. Poor kids, how 
they have suffered. Ah, but I like to hear some- 
one talk of England again. Makes me feel young. 
How I shudder to think of what's happening to 
my relatives in England, poor creatures. And 
the way the children described that old tree 
down by the lane made me think of my old tree 
friend. The children said it was blown up by a 
bomb. How dreadful! Wonder what it's like, 
we don't have them here, you know, bombs I 
mean — thank goodness. 

Oh! I just had an awful thought, the tree 
the children said was bombed is my old friend! 
I know it, I feel it in my twigs." 



And the old tree waved its leaves sorrowfully 



24 



THE TATTLER 



at the stars, who twinkled back sympathetically 
because they knew that tonight the old tree was 
remembering. 

Arlene Sabo '43 

CONQUERING DIPHTHERIA 

Just before the last World War, diphtheria 
was spreading very rapidly in many parts of 
Europe. A cure had not been found and thous- 
ands of people were dying. 

In a small hospital in a suburb of Berlin, a 
little girl lay in bed with the then incurable 
diphtheria. Her mother was very much upset for 
she knew that this case, like many others, was 
hopeless. 

Doctor Kertzman said in a low voice, "There 
is very little we can do for the girl. It is only 
a matter of time. She may live, but the chances 
are very poor." 

"Yes, Doctor," the head nurse agreed. "It is 
very sad to see those poor children die from 
diphtheria. If only someone could find a cure." 

In another part of Berlin, a German was look- 
ing for little germs under the microscope. This 
man was Emil August Behring. One morning he 
reached his laboratory to find that some of his 
experimental animals, which he thought were dy- 
ing from diphtheria, were very much alive. His 
day of days had come. 

"At last, I have cured diphtheria," whispered 
Behring. "Nothing can stop me now." 

The next thing to be done was to try the 
serum on children. He went to the hospital. See- 
ing the rows of suffering patients, he knew the 
serum would have to cure, or he would be very 
disappointed and discouraged. 

In that far away hospital, near Berlin, the 
serum that was discovered by Behring had been 
injected into the arm of Freya, who had diph- 
theria. She was now getting well. 

Freya opened her eyes. A group of doctors 
and nurses were around her. By the bedside her 
mother stood looking at the small form in the 
bed. It was incredible. 

Later the doctors told Freya how a man named 
Behring had discovered a serum for diphtheria. 
Raising her head she whispered a word of prayer 
for Behring, who for the lives of children had 
found a cure for diphtheria. 

Joyce Mason '43 

THE GREAT HUNTER 

Most of the men folks of Chermopa — a small 
town on the edge of Lake Kondo, which at this 



time was dangerous country because of all the 
wild animals there — were seated around the stove 
in the town's only store. They were discussing 
trapping and hunting, when trapper Dan came 
in with the pelt of a large grizzly bear. Everyone 
stopped talking because he wanted to hear how 
Dan had caught such a large bear — especially 
at this time of year when they were very hungry. 

They did not have to wait long because Dan 
was a great one to talk. He seated himself com- 
fortably and started his tale. 

"Wal," said Dan. "Th' other marnen when a' 
gets up a' sees th' biggest bar tracks I'd even 
seed, so a' gets me shooten irn and started out on 
his trail. Before long a' hears a great amount of 
rustlin an' snappin an' outtin a thicket comes 
the dangdest largest bar a' ever deed saw a' 
coming straight far me. A' pulled up ole Suzie, 
a' held ma groun', an' shot right at 'im. I was 
plumb surprised when the rifle ball didn't even 
stop 'em, but seein how a' war brave, I stood me 
groun' and drawed me bowie knife to fight 'em 
to the finish." 

At this point in the story everyone was open- 
mouthed. 

"Wal," continued Dan. "After a plumb ex- 
citin' battle the best man, which war me, emerged 
the victor. And a' toted that thar bear all the 
way to ma' cabin." 

The men around the old store stove were very 
much impressed with Dan's story, and called him 
a hero. But they never knew the truth of that 
battle — how trapper Dan was awakened early 
that morning by the shot of a gun. He had made 
a gun trap so that he could remain safely inside 
the cabin while the bear unknowingly walked 
into the trap and shot himself. 

Harry Warner '42 

CEMETERIES' UNION BALL 

Dear Mr. Brocton: 

We cordially invite you to attend the Ceme- 
teries' Union Ball to be held in the Ghost Ave- 
nue Cemetery on the 21st, of which night there 
will be no moon. Come at midnight robed in 
your ghost's mantle and carry your chains of 
woe. The admission price is twenty bones and 
the skull of the late Mayor Williams will be 
passed in order to collect the contributions that 
you will surely wish to make. The embalmcr 
will serve refreshments and the Crepehangers 
Association will decorate the gravestones and 
trim the vault for a dining hall. Murder will be 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



25 



committed for the amusement of the children and 
suicide will be permitted. 

If you do not have a means of transportation 
the hearse will call for you. 

Ghostly yours, 
The Sec'y of the Cemeteries 1 Union 

Similar letters were written in blood to other 
prominent men and women of the small city and 
placed under their doors. 

The next morning the telephone in the police 
office was constantly ringing and frightened 
voices would say, "Officer, I received the most 
horrible letter. Why it's blood curdling to think 
of it." Officers would calmly ask the details 

By noon everyone knew that some mysterious 
personnage had sent letters to prominent people 
inviting them to some kind of a dance in the 
cemetery. The pupils in the local grammar and 
high schools were questioned as well as others 
who they thought might be guilty. The police 
were busy night and day but not a trace of the 
culprit could be found. 

The undertaker, a Mr. Beardsley by name, was 
asked to keep special watch over his undertak' 
ing rooms and likewise the cemetery was guarded. 
Having looked in vain, the police decided that 
the only way to catch the culprit would be to 
have the people go to the cemetery at the ap- 
pointed time and the police would catch him 
then and there. 

The night of the twentyfirst was one of those 
hot, sultry, moonless, nights when the tenseness 
just before an electrical storm reigns. The peo- 
pie arrived in front of the vault just as the clock 
was striking twelve. They were a ghastly look' 
ing group, clad in sheets, dragging chains, and 
carrying bones. The whole police force was hid- 
ing behind shrubbery and tombstones. On the 
last strike the heavy vault door swung slowly 
open with a loud scraping, squeaking noise. A 
black figure with a candle on its head and car- 
rying a huge hour glass slowly ascended from its 
blackest depths and stood before the group. 
In a voice musty with age it drawled: 
"I am glad to see so many of you present. 
My speech will be short but definite. This town 
affords no place for the younger children to play 
by day or the older ones by night. The need is 
quite obvious. If they do not have it many of 
the younger ones will soon be lying here in the 
graveyard. Killed because they had no other 
place to play than in the streets! The older ones 
who hang out in the beer joints will either com- 
mit murder or suicide." 



At those words a hearse careened dizzily up 
the drive and came to an abrupt stop. As it did 
so there rang on the still night air a most hor- 
rible blood curdling scream. The group shud- 
dered and trembled crying, "What can we do to 
prevent it?" 

The voice went on in the same melancholy 
tone. 

"You can contribute money to be used to 
build a community house." 

The next morning the family of Beardsley's 
was very serious over their morning coffee. Grim 
Mr. Beardsly glanced at young Roy and sternly 
said. 

"Son, I'm seriously disgusted with your action 
of last night." 

And a good right he had to be. For their 
family was one of the most respected in the town. 
Their only son, Roy, a boy of eighteen, would 
be graduated in less than a month from the 
high school as the valedictorian of his class. He 
was so studious that he never even participated 
in many of the high school activities. And to 
think that his son Roy would do such a thing. 

His father continued, "Roy Beardsley, what 
were you thinking of?" 

"But father — ." 

"No But father", about it! You have ruined 
my business and the reputation of our whole 
family with your silly whims." 

Stubbornly his son replied, "But they do need 
some place to play and you know it." 

"I will take no back talk from a child of 
mine." 

A silence heavy with anger reigned for a few 
minutes while the family quietly resumed their 
meal. 

Then — "Why should we wealthy people be 
forced to pay for playthings for paupers?" 

"It's not for the poor alone. It's for fellows 
like Dick Newton, too, who don't have any place 
to go nights except down to the Idledell Cafe 
and drink." 

Mr. Beardsley seemed to have softened and he 
surprisedly answered, "I don't believe that Law- 
yer Newton would allow a son of his to do that." 

Sticking fast to his belief, Roy replied, "He 
doesn't know about it. — But I do and I can 
prove it." 

"Well, son, perhaps you are right. I'll see 
what I can do." 

As Roy got up to leave he shook hands with 
his father and said, "That's great. Thanks a 
lot, Dad." 

In less than six months a beautiful community 



26 



THE TATTLER 



house replaced the fallen down harn in the va' 
cant lot on Hillside Terrace. 

Outsiders entering the large spacious hall won- 
der at the script above the door: "Money raised 
by the Cemeteries' Union Ball," The story of 
that memorable night is repeated many times 
around the fires of the townspeople during the 
long winter evenings. 

Sylvia Clary '42 

THE FAMILY CAR 

Characters 
Mr. John Davis An Ambitious Business Man 

Mrs. Davis His Wife 

Mary Davis Their 19 year-old daughter 

Paul Davis A typical high school boy 

The time is early evening. The scene is the 
living room of the Davis' home. Father Davis is 
sitting in an easy chair reading a newspaper while 
his wife is reading a book in another chair. 

Father: Well Fm glad to see that you're going 
to stay home tonight. This is one evening that 
I can have the car. 

Mother: Oh but John, dear. Don't you re- 
member, I've got to go to the bridge club. Sd 
I must have the car. 

Father: Yes dear: but how am I going to go to 
the lodge. You don't expect me to walk all the 
way down there, do you? 

Mary: (Coming downstairs, all dressed up) 
Dad, is there enough gas in the car? 

Father: Yes, but where do you think you're 
going? 

Mary: (Calmly) Oh, I'm going to drive over 
to the Country Club. I'm going to meet Jack 
there. 

Mother: But you can't use the car because 
I've got to have it. 

Father: Well, I'm certainly not going to walk 
to the lodge meeting. 

Paul: (Running downstairs. He is dressed up 
too.) Good-bye folks. I'll see you later. 

Father: Do you mean to say that you've got 
to have the car tonight too. 

Paul: Of course. Polly and I are going riding. 
Why? Does someone else need the car? 

Mother: I've got to go to the Bridge Club. 

Father: I'm going down to the lodge. 

Mary: And I promised to meet Jack at the 
Country Club. 

Father: (Giving up) Well it is certainly clear 
that we all can't have the car tonight. Anyway 
I guess the lodge can get along without me to- 
night. I don't think I'll go. (He return- to his 



reading.) 

Mother: I feel the same way too, John. I 
think the children should have the car. I've 
been to every bridge club meeting lately anyway 
so I guess they won't miss me this once. 

Paul: Well Mary. It's up to us. Your date 
can't be very important so I'll take the car to- 
night. 

Mary: Wait a minute, my dear brother. Not 
so fast. My date is a lot more important than 
yours and I need the car. 

Paul: Is that so? Well, I'm going to have it. 
(They both start towards the door.) 

Father: Stop quarreling and decide it peace- 
ably. You know you both can't have the car. 
Why don't you flip a coin or decide some other 
way? 

Paul: (Producing a coin) That's a good idea. 
I'll flip a coin. Which do you want, Mary. 
Heads or tails? 

Mary: Heads. 

Paul: (In a discouraged way) Oh-oh, it's 
heads. O-K, you win, Mary. You can have the 
car. 

Mary: (Going out) Goodbye Dad. Good- 
night Mom. 

Father: Well, I'm glad that's settled. (There 
is a short silence following which Mary returns.) 

Mary: I've been thinking it over and I don't 
think I'll go to the Country Club tonight. I'll 
call Jack and call it off. You can have the car, 
Paul. 

Paul: (Surprised at his sister's generosity) 
Gee thanks, Mary. (He goes out.) 

(Mary goes to the telephone and calls Jack) 

Father: I wonder what has come over her. I 
thought her date was important. Oh well. It's 
probably nothing. 

Mary: (Returning from the telephone.) Good- 
night, Mother. I think I'll go upstairs to bed. 
(She goes upstairs) 

Mother: What, so early? You aren't sick, 
are you Mary? 

Mary: (From upstairs) No Mother, I'm all 
right. 

Father: It certainly is strange. Something 
must have come over — (He is interrupted by 
Paul returning) 

Paul: (Standing in doorway) I don't think 
I'll be needing the car tonight. Dad. Polly and 
I arc going for a walk, instead. Goodnight. (He 
goes out again) 

Father: (Surprised at his son's change) Can 
you beat that. Five minutes ago. they were both 
(Continued on Page 34) 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



27 




Seated — June Bowker, Rita Kulash, Miss Damon, Russell Bisbee, Jean Warner, Doris Sincage. 
Standing — Robert Newell, Leo Dymerski, Adelbert Roberge, Edward Ames, Ralph Bates, Charles 
Bartlett. Absent — Eloise Bartlett. 



Tattler Staff 



28 



THE TATTLER 




Standing — Miss Damon, **Robert Newell, **Russell Bisbee, ***Lucius Merritt, **Charles Bart' 

lett, *Mr. Walker. 
Seated — Constance Granger, Mary Daniels, ***Mrs. Warner, Ruth Beebe, *Sylvia Clary, *Lida 

Miner. 
Absent — *Faith Dresser. 
♦♦♦Degree Excellence. **Degree of Honor. *Degree of Merit. 

National Forensic League 



The officers of the Forensic Club for 1941 
are: President, Lida Miner: Vice President. 
Russell Bisbee: Secretary, Faith Dresser; Treas- 
urer, Lucius Merritt; Executive Committee, Ed- 
ward Ames, Robert Newell and Sylvia Clary. 

The food sales and card party held in the 
summer of 1940 netted enough to pay all tourna- 
ment expenses. Chesterfield raised $25, the 
largest single amount. 

W.H.S. had teams in the Connecticut Valley 
Debate League again this year and these teams 
also entered both the pre-state and the State 
Tournaments. We also entered two orators in 
each declamation group. Constance Granger 
and Lucius Merritt won first and second places 
in the humorous declamations at the pre-state 
tournament in Hadley, and both were in the fi- 
nals at the State tournament in Northampton. 
Mary Daniels and Ruth Beebe were entered in 
the dramatic declamation group and Lida Miner 
and Sylvia Clary were in the oratorical group. 



Mrs. Warner, our N.F.L. sponsor, was one of 
the banquet speakers at the state tournament. 

This year W.H.S. was honored by the elec- 
tion of two of its boys, Lucius Merritt and Rus- 
sell Bisbee, to the Senate and the House of Rep- 
resentatives, respectively, of the Fifth National 
Student Congress which ran concurrently with 
the National N.F.L. Tournament at Lexington, 
Kentucky. Accompanied by Supt. and Mrs. 
Merritt the boys left for the Blue Grass Country 
on April 25 by automobile. L'pon arrival, Sun- 
day, they were both seated as the two Senators 
representing New England and won prestige for 
W.H.S. and points for themselves by their ac- 
tion in the Senate. This Congress was modeled 
exactly alter the national Congress in Washing- 
ton and the experience gained there will long be 
remembered. Alter spending four days there the 
group started lor home early on the morning 
of May 1st and came home through Washing' 
ton, D. C. 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



29 




Seated — Thelma Packard, Lida Miner, Phyllis Sutherland, Faith Dresser, Mary Daniels, Doris 

Sincage, Lena Guyette. 
Standing — Rita Kulash, Josephine Cerpovicz, Richard Culver, Russell Bisbee, Charles Bartlett, 

Sylvia Clary, Jean Warner. Absent — Eloise Bartlett. 



Pro Merito 



OFFICERS 
Seniors: 

President — Russell Bisbee 

Vice President — Lida Miner 

SecretaryTreasurer — Mary Daniels 
Juniors: 

President — Jean Warner 

Vice President — Thelma Packard 

Secretary — Sylvia Clary 

Treasurer — Doris Sincage 

Eight members of our Pro Merito Society ac- 
companied by Miss Dunphy attended the annual 
fall meeting of the Massachusetts Pro Merito 
Societies at Hopkins Academy in Hadley on 
Oct. 19, 1940. Nearly 300 other delegates from 
the state also attended. At eleven o'clock, busi- 
ness meetings for both the Senior and Junior So- 
cieties were held. At noon a luncheon was 
served in the First Church, the oldest church in 
the town. Because of the large number of dele- 
gates, the group was divided and while part 



were eating, the others made a tour of historical 
parts of the town. 

The speaking part of the program began at 
two o'clock in the Academy Gymnasium. Rev. 
George S. Brooks, D.D., of Rockville, Conn., 
gave the main address of the day on "Thank 
You, America." The address was a combina- 
tion of humor and inspiration drawn from the 
experiences of the speaker. Following the meet- 
ing the group attended a football game between 
Mass. State and Rhode Island at Amherst. 

The 25th anniversary of the Pro Merito So- 
ciety was celebrated at the State meeting held at 
Smith Academy in Hatfield, May 10, 1941. Five 
Williamsburg members and Miss Dunphy at- 
tended. The business meetings of both Senior 
and Junior societies were held following a gener- 
al meeting at 1 1 o'clock. After the business 
sessions the delegates filed out and a motion pic- 
ture camera was ready to record the colorful pro- 
(Continued on Page 35) 



30 



THE TATTLER 




Front row — Henry Kopka, Ralph Bates, Richard Culver, Gerald Larkin, Edward Ames, Frederick 

Allen, Leo Dymerski. 
Second row — Robert Newell, Mgr. Francis O'Brien, John O'Brien, Edward Golash, Harry Warner, 

Neil Damon, Howard O'Brien, Robert Algustoski, Thomas Algustoski, Coach Mullaly. 



Baseball 



Twenty candidates reported to Coach Mullaly 
for the initial practice. Of this number, five saw 
service last year. The team lost two good pitchers 
in Murphy and Ryan and it will be hard to find 
someone to fill their shoes. Otherwise the team 
is in good shape, although good hitters are lack- 
ing. This year the team will play only eleven 
games, which is due to the lateness in getting 
started. The schedule includes games with St. 
Michaels, Easthampton, Hopkins Academy, Bel- 
chertown, Sanderson Academy and Clarke 
School. Six players will be lost through gradua- 
tion. They are Jerry Larkin, Ted Ames, Richard 
Culver, Henry Kopka, Ralph Bates and Leo Dy- 
merski. High hopes are held for a successful 
season. 

Summary of games up to the time of this pub- 
lication: 

Williamsburg 3 St. Michaels 2 

Williamsburg 2 Hopkins 6 

Williamsburg 18 S.mderson 12 

Williamsburg 1 1 Bclchertown 9 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



31 




Kneeling — Edward Ames, Gerald Larkin, Robert McAllister, Leo Dymerski, Ralph Bates. 
Standing — Mgr. Frederick King, Francis Demerski George Molloy, John O'Brien, Edward Golash, 
Michael Batura, Coach Franklin Mullaly. 



Boys' Basketball 



Although Williamsburg High School played 
many schools out of its class in basketball this 
year, the Green Wave came through with a 
record of 7 games won and 10 games lost in a 
schedule of 17 contests. Ted Ames and Jerry 
Larkin were elected co'captains by the players 
for the year. Burgy rated second in the Frank' 
lin League race with Clarke School the winner. 
1941 marked the first year that the Franklin 
League sponsored an albstar game and a coaches- 
players benefit contest in order to get trophies 
and medals for the outstanding players. Ames, 
Bates and Dymerski were the Burgy players who 
received these trophies. The team received an in- 
vitation to play in the "Wee" Tournament at 
Msasachusetts State College. It drew North 
Brookfield High as its first opponent and they 
gave that team its hardest game as North Brook' 
field won the tournament. Burgy was beaten 22 
to 21 in an overtime game. This year the team 
will lose five players — Ames, Dymerski, McAl- 



lister, Bates and Larkin, but Coach Mullaly ex- 
pects to have an equally good team in 1942. 



Su 


MMARY 


of Games 




Williamsburg 


16 


Rosary 


16 


Williamsburg 


26 


South Hadley 


44 


Williamsburg 


28 


Chester 


31 


Williamsburg 


23 


Alumni 


19 


Williamsburg 


36 


Charlemont 


22 


Williamsburg 


32 


Belchertown 


51 


Williamsburg 


27 


Powers 


34 


Williamsburg 


26 


Sanderson 


20 


Williamsburg 


25 


Clarke 


34 


Williamsburg 


15 


Chester 


28 


Williamsburg 


43 


Charlemont 


26 


Williamsburg 


35 


Powers 


24 


Williamsburg 


45 


Sanderson 


32 


Williamsburg 


32 


Huntington 


40 


Williamsburg 


35 


Clarke 


47 


Williamsburg 


36 


Huntington 


33 


Williamsburg 


21 


North Brookfield 


N 22 



32 



THE TATTLER 




Front row — James McAllister, John O'Brien, Michael Batura, Ralph Bates, Edward Ames, Robert 

Algustoski, Edward Sincage, John Polwrek. 
Second row — Harold Hillenbrand, Frederick King, Mgr. Thomas Algustoski: Henry Kopka, Gerald 

Larkin, George Packard, George Molloy, Howard O'Brien, Harry Warner, Coach Mullaly. 
Third row — Leo Dymerski, Robert Newell, Robert McAllister, Lucius Merritt, Francis O'Brien, 

Edward Golash. 



Soccer 



About twcntyfive candidates greeted Coach 
Mullaly for the initial practice. This was the sec- 
ond year that Burgy sponsored a soccer team and 
the team did a little better than the first year. 
Burgy finished last in the Hampshire League but 
that was expected because of inexperience and 
the lack of good players. The league is consid- 
ered one of the fastest in soccer in Western 
Massachusetts so the standing of Burgy can be 
considered fairly good. Next year Coach Mullaly 
hopes to do better because the players will have 
gathered some experience and the fine points of 
the game by then. Seven players will be lost 
through graduation. 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



33 




Seated — Margaret Ryan, Thelma Packard, Charlotte Otis, Rita Kulash, June Bowker, Cecilia Soltys. 
Standing — Doris Dymerski, Bernice Golash, Coach Miss Damon, Betty Damon, Mary Bowker. 



Girls' Basketball 



This year our girls' basketball team was under 
the direction of a new coach, Miss Margery Da' 
mon. At the beginning of the season a meeting 
was held and officers were chosen as follows: 
Co-Captains, Rita Kulash and Charlotte Otis: 
Manager, June Bowker. 

Because of a new rule passed by the school, 
our games were played in the afternoons this 
year. In this way we were able to play some 
of the larger schools we had not played before. 
Our first two games were played with the Cum- 
mington girls, and we won both these matches. 
We also had the opportunity of meeting the 
Easthampton girls on the new gym of that school. 
Two games were played with the girls from the 
Northampton "Y". 

With fighting spirits we went into the Frank- 
lin League and played our first game with Powers 
Institute of Bernardston. We ended our Frank- 
lin League season with three wins and three 
losses — beating Sanderson, Powers, and Charle- 
mont once and being defeated by each of these 
teams once. 

Other teams played outside of the League 



were Chester, St. Michaels, and the Alumnae. 
We closed our basketball season with seven 
games won and eleven lost. We are sorry to 
lose this year two of our star players, June Bow- 
ker and Rita Kulas, but with a number of ex- 
perienced girls for next year's team we hope 
to have great success. 

Summary of Games 



Williamsburg 


19 


Easthampton 




29 


Williamsburg 


35 


Easthampton 




31 


Williamsburg 


12 


Northampton 


■i Y " 


22 


Williamsburg 


18 


Alumnae 




22 


Williamsburg 


34 


Powers 




43 


Williamsburg 


10 


Northampton 


"Y" 


8 


Williamsburg 


11 


Northampton 


"Y" 


13 


Williamsburg 


15 


Sanderson 




17 


Williamsburg 


33 


Charlemont 




25 


Williamsburg 


25 


Powers 




18 


Williamsburg 


16 


Charlemont 




28 


Williamsburg 


15 


Chester 




18 


Williamsburg 


56 


Sanderson 




16 


Williamsburg 


12 


St. Michaels 




24 


Williamsburg 


15 


Chester 




28 


Williamsburg 


12 


St. Michaels 




26 



34 



THE TATTLER 



Alumni Notes 



ALUMNI OFFICERS 
President — Allen Bisbee 
Vice-President — Chester King 
Secretary — Ruth Jorgenson 
Treasurer — Marjorie Damon 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Louise Mosher Miss Anne Dunphy 

Mrs. Hubert Smith Mrs. R. A. Warner 

Robert Mathers Edward Foster 

Elizabeth Burke 
Clarence Larkin 
Martin Dunphy 

MARRIAGES 
Ruth Dodge '40— Charles Witherell 
Jean Everett '40 — Carl Heminway 
Marion Sabo '40 — Wesley Ames 
Doris Williams '40 — William Dodge 
Evelyn Rustemeyer '35 — Chester Kmit 
Phyllis Damon 37 — D. Morgan Campbell 
Marie Allaire '34 — George Mollison '34 
Helen Merritt '3 3 — Robert Stene 
Richard Ames '38 — Stafia Olzchewski 

BIRTHS 
Daughter to Evelyn Rustemeyer Kmit '35 
Daughter to Edna Thayer Cehura '37 
Daughter to Walter Kulash "29 
Son to Louis Bisbee Gillman '3 2 
Son to Edith Packard Stowe '39 
Son to John Shaw '33 

GRADUATES 
Vernon West — Bridgewater State Teacher's 
College 

Annetta Barrus — Bates College 

Ruth Barrus — Massachusetts State College 



THE FAMILY CAR 

(Continued from Page 26) 

fighting for the car and now neither of them 

wants it. Well, Mother, I guess you can go to 

the bridge club after all. 

Mother: (Laying aside her reading) I can't 
understand it either. You would have thought 
to hear them that it was absolutely necessary that 
they should have the car. But anyway, I'm on 
my way to the bridge club. (She gets her hat 
and coat) Goodnight John. (She goes out) 

Father: Goodnight, dear. Have a good time 
— Now where was I. Oh yes. (He resumes read- 
ing) 

(After a short period of quiet, Mr. Davis 



CLASS OF 1940 

Franklin Bartlett — Working in Feeding Hills. 

Velma Brown — Office of Haydenville Brass 
Company. 

Betty Tetro Buford — Working in department 
store in Boston. 

Myla Campbell — Bay Path Institute. 

Shirley Campbell — Chamberlain Junior Col- 
lege. 

Leslie Cole — Westfield Normal School. 

Ruth Dodge — Mrs. Charles Witherell. 

Jean Everett — Mrs. Carl Hemingway. 

Marcia Ingellis — McCallum's Hosiery. 

Logia Jablonski — At home. 

Raymond Johnrow — Haydenville Brass Com- 
pany. 

Rita LaCourse — McCarthy's Commercial Col- 
lege. 

Anne Lloyd — Northampton Commercial Col- 
lege. 



Sil 



ver 



Cor 



Francis Molloy — International 
pany. 

Bernard Murphy — N.Y.A. Resident School 
Spencer. 

Barbara Nash — Northampton Commercial Col- 
lege. 

Florence Packard — Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Shirley Rhoades — Smith School. 

Ashton Rustemeyer — Williston Academy. 

William Ryan — Haydenville Brass Company. 

Marion Sabo — Mrs. Weselly Ames. 

Bernard Sampson — Smith School. 

Winthrop Stone — Smith School. 

Doris Williams — Mrs. William Dodge. 

Henry Wilson — Toto's Soda Shoppe. 



looks up to see his wife coming back in.) 

What's the matter? Have you decided not to 
go, too? 

Mother: (Laughing) Oh John. Now I know- 
why the children didn't want the car. And for 
the same reason I don't want it either. 

Father: (Getting up and putting on his coat) 
In that case I'll take it. I really ought to be at 
the lodge tonight anyway. (He starts towards 
the door with hat in his hand.) 

Mother: Wait a minute, dear. You'd bettor 
take that coat off and roll up your sleeves fir^t 
You sec the rear tire of the car is flat. 

Father: (Stopping) Oh so that's the reason. 



WILLIAMSBURGH HIGH SCHOOL 



35 



Well I might have known it. But I'll get to the 
lodge anyway, as soon as I change that tire. 

(He goes out, after taking off his coat and 
rolling up his sleeves. Mrs. Davis smiles and 
takes off her coat. She sits down again as the 
curtain falls). 

Russell Bisbee '41 

CLASS STATISTICS 
(Continued from Page 17) 



Cutest Girl 
Cutest Boy 
Most Talkative Girl 
Most Talkative Boy 
Jolliest Girl 
Jolliest Boy 



Lida Miner 

Leo Dymerski 

Faith Dresser 

Lucius Merritt 

Lida Miner 
Leo Dymerski 



Girl With The Most Pleasing Personality 

Lida Miner 
Boy With The Most Pleasing Personality 

Russell Bisbee 
Most Bashful Girl Phyllis Sutherland 

Most Bashful Boys 

Henry Kopka and Robert Kearney 
Most Business Like Student Russell Bisbee 



Model Student 
Class Orator 
Class Giggler 
Class Sheik 
Class Bluff 
Favorite Subject 
Favorite Gum 
Favorite Sport 
Oldest Girl 
Oldest Boy 
Youngest Girl 
Youngest Boy 



Russell Bisbee 

Lucius Merritt 

Lida Miner 

Ralph Bates 

Lucius Merritt 

Typing 

Dentyne 

Basketball 

Jeannette Wright 

Robert Kearney 

Constance Granger 

Robert McAllister 



PRO MERITO 
(Continued from Page 29) 
cession as it marched to the Congregational 
Church for lunch. At 1:45 the group assembled 
in the Town Hall to hear a special Pro Merito 
program broadcast from WHYN in Northamp- 
ton. The speaker of the afternoon was Dr. 
E. Dwight Salmon, Professor of History at Am- 
hert College, who spoke on the subject "Latin 
America and Hemisphere Defense". The con- 
vention concluded with a baseball game between 
Hopkins Academy and Smith Academy. 



Class Song 



(Tune of "Amapola") 

Dear Old Burgy 

We are about to leave you 
You're the school where we tried to learn so 
eagerly 

Since we came here 
Our hearts were always with you 

And being here it seemed to be a paradise 
Dear Old Burgy 

Now that we have to leave you 
Our mem'ries of you will forever be 

Dear Old Burgy Dear Old Burgy 
How we long to stay with you forever 

Words by June Bowker, Class of '41 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Packard's Soda Shoppe 

OPPOSITE TOWN HALL 

School Supplies, Magazines, Greeting Cards 

FILMS AND DEVELOPING 

Hoods Ice Cream McKesson Products 

FOUNTAIN & BOOTH SERVICE 



Thorough business training was never so essential for so 
many people. 

Northampton Commercial College 

JOHN C. PICKETT, PRINCIPAL 
"The School of Thoroughness" 



46th YEAR 



46th YEAR 




WILLIAMSBURG GARAGE 

C. K. HATHAWAY 


Emerick's 


Tel. 4351 

Service Station 


Repair Shop 


Battery Service 


All Makes of Cars 


Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars 




WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 


HAYDENVILLE 



Compliments of 



THE CLARY FARM 

SILAS SNOW 
Try Our Maple Syrup 



Telephone 3563 

WILLIAMSBURG 



Village Hill Nursery 



ALPINES, PERENNIALS 



and 



ANNUAL PLANTS 



WILLIAMSBURG 



Hillcrest Farm 


Compliments of 


Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 

SINGLE COMB 


FIRST NATIONAL 


RHODE ISLAND REDS 


STORES 


Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 
WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 


WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 



CHAS. A. BOWKER 



Hardware, Paint and General Merchandise 



TELEPHONE 245 



WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 

Charles Tiley 

WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 


Compliments oi 

M. M. Dunphy 

D.D.S. 
Northampton, Mass. 


Breguet's 

SERVICE STATION 

Mobilgas Mobiloil 
Mobilubrication 

Florence, Mass. 


Hardware, Sporting Goods 

Fishing Tackle, Baseball, Tennis 

and Camping Items 

FOSTER-FARRAR CO. 

162 Main St. 
Northampton, Mass. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

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and Son 

FUNERAL HOME 

SOUTH MAIN STREET 
HAYDENVILLE 


Snyder's Express 

23 Years of 
Friendly Service 


BROOKES GARAGE 

Colonial Esso Dealer 

GAS— OIL— ACCESSORIES 
ELECTRIC WELDING 

Route 9, Berkshire Trail 
Goshen, Mass. 



Remember the Excitement in Your Neighborhood When the Last House Burned? 

Then the Sad News, "NO INSURANCE". Never Let that Happen at 

YOUR HOUSE. We Will Protect you the MOMENT YOU 

'PHONE US. Do it NOW 



FRANKLIN KING, Jr. 



277 Main Street 



INSURANCE 

Phone 610 



Northampton, Mass. 



NEWELL FUNERAL HOME 



R. D. NEWELL 



74 KING STREET 



NORTHAMPTON 



Stationery 



C. F. JENKINS 

Greeting Cards 
Ice Cream 

WILLIAMSBURG 



Medicines 



CHILSON'S SHOPS 

W. Leroy Chilson 

AWNINGS 
FURNITURE COVERINGS & UPHOLSTERING SUPPLIES 



Furniture Upholstering 

Harness Shop 

Slip Covers, Cushions 



Automobile Plate and Safety Glass 

Auto Tops and Upholstery 

Truck Covers and Canvas Goods 



34 CENTER STREET, NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 



F. N. Graves & Son 



WILLIAMSBURG 



ED RYAN'S 
ESSO SERVICENTER 

Gasoline — Motor Oil 
Tires, Batteries <S Accessories 

ROUTE 9 HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 



Athletic Supplies 

FOR EVERY SPORT 

T. A. PURSEGLOVE 

15 State Street 



HARLOW'S 

Fine Luggage 
Bill Folds Keytainers 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

28 Center St.. Tel. 155-W 
Northampton 



BEST WISHES 

TO THE 
CLASS OF 1941 

Cohen Bros. 

NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments 
of 



MORIARTY BROS. 



FURNITURE 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



When in need of 




Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes 


Jones The Florist 


for Men and Boys 




TRY 


Bulbs Perennials 


THE FLORENCE STORE 

90 Maple St. Florence 


Cut Flowers Floral Designs 


Telephone 828-W J. A. Longtin 
Service — Quality — Satisfaction 


Tel. 4331 Haydenville 


TODD'S 


NORTHAMPTON 


To the graduates of the Class of 1941 


CONGRATULATIONS AND SUCCESS 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
A 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


FRIEND 


WOODWORTH 




BEAUTY SALON 
O. J. BONNEAU. Prop. 




Compliments of 


200 Main St. 


HERLIHY'S 




Dry Goods Store 


PHONE 2390 


76 Maple St., Florence 


NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Ely Funeral Home 

CHARLES E. ELY 

Lady Assistant 



Tel. 1292-W 



Northampton 



After Graduation . . . What? 



This is a momentous question for all graduates. Some will continue to seek more learn- 
ing . . . others to look to a business career . . . others don't know just what to plan. 

Graduating from Williamsburg High School gives you a good foundation for a success- 
ful future. Congratulations to all graduates and wishing you all the success in the world. 



McCALLUM'S 



Compliments of 



ED SHEEHAN 



24 Pleasant Street 



Northampton, Mass. 



Winthrop Foster 

NORTHAMPTON'S CAMERA SHOP 

"We have the film — 
we load your Camera" 



Phone 1040 



Draper Hotel Bldg. 



Smart Wearing Apparel for 

Young Men 

at Moderate Pricec 

Harry Daniel Associates 

Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments 

Noble & Flynn 

REGISTERED 
PHARMACISTS 

ICE CREAM SODAS COLLEGE ICES 

24 Main St. Northampton 



For the young man who grad- 
uates this year we have every- 
thing that he will need for this 
important occasion. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

NORTHAMPTON 




GORHAM STERLING 

TODAY SOLD IN 
UNITS AS LOW AS 

$16.50 



E. J. GARE 
& SON 



Good Shoes 

Correctly Fitted 

Reasonably Priced 

DAVID BOOT SHOP 



221 Main St. 
Northampton. 



Mass. 



The E & J Cigar Co. 

Wholesale Tobacconists 

23 MAIN ST. 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Beebe's Lunch 

A good place to eat 
TOASTED SANDWICHES 

Berkshire Trail A. L. Beebe, Prop. 

HAYDENVILLE 



HILL BROS. 

Silk Hosiery 

Socks 

Pajamas 

Main St. Northampton 




IDE DEARING 

Jeweler 
Watchmaker 

116 MAIN ST. Upstairs 
PHONE 3511 





Compliments 


BERGMANN'S BAKERY 


of 


BREAD AND PASTRY 






E. J. Gusetti 


16 Briggs Street 


HAYDENVILLE 


Tel. 390 Easthampton. Mass. 




Compliments of 


A. Soltys 


C. O. CARLSON 


MEATS GROCERIES 
VEGETABLES 


GOSHEN 


Telephone 223 Haydenville 


Socony Service 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


Station 


Fair Store 


DIAL 275 


27 Pleasant St.. Northampton 


WILLIAMSBURG 


Herman A. Cone, Prop. 


Good Things to Eat 




BECKM 


[ANN'S 


NORTHA 


MPTON 


Candy Mailed 


Tasty Pastries 


Refreshing Sodas . 


Fine Ice Cream 



Modern Education 



Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing eyes 
which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent defects 
in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after. A little fore- 
sight now may keep them from wearing glasses later and will help 
them in their studies. Let us examine their eyes. 



O. T. DEWHURST 



OPTOMETRISTS AND OPTICIANS 
201 Main Street Tel. 184-W Northampton 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



R. F. BURKE 



WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 



Tie 

Hayaenville Savings Dank 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


HENRY A. BIDWELL 




INSURANCE REAL ESTATE 


National 


BIDWELL TRAVEL SERVICE 


Shoe Repairing 


Tours — Cruises 


John Mateja, Prop. 


Airline and Steamship Tickets 


15 Masonic Street 


Nonotuck Savings Bank Building 


Tel. 826-W 


78 Main Street Northampton, Mass. 


Northampton, Mass. 


Office Phone 351— Res. Phone 348 


Compliments of 




SHUMWAY & RILEY, Inc. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


Plumbing & Heating 


A 


Distributor of Pioneer Oil Burners 


Center St. Northampton 


FRIEND 


Tel. 176 




Ward E. Shumway, Prop. 




Charles W. Wells 


Compliments of 


R.C.A. RADIO 

KELVINATOR REFRIGERATORS 


JOHN H. GRAHAM, ESTATE 


ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 


COAL — OIL — ICE 


Tel. 3921 Haydenville 


WILLIAMSBURG 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

MacLEOD TREE CARE 

Telephone 211 Williamsburg 

J. W. PARSONS & SON 

Tractors and Farm Machinery 
131 Bridge Street Tel. 2885 Northampton 



You may always depend upon the quality of flowers 

which come from 



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PAINTS AND WALL PAPER 



Pierce's Paint Store 



TEL. 1207 196 MAIN ST. 



ALLISON SPENCE 

100 Main Street, Northampton 

Photographer to Williamsburg High School 
Since 1917 with two exceptions 



'THANKS BURGY" 



CHARLES A. BISBEE HOMER R. BISBEE 

Tel. Chesterfield 2143 Tel. Chesterfield 2141 

BISBEE BROTHERS 

Dealers in all kinds of 

Grain, Feed, Fertilizers, Salt, Cement, and Agricultural Tools 

Bird & Sons Roofing Paper Engines and Separators 

International Harvester Co. McCormick Line Harvesting Machinery 

Building Material Oliver Plows and Cultivators High Grade Grass Seed 

Norfolk Paint 

Get our prices on anything you need 
before ordering elsewhere 

STOREHOUSES AT WILLIAMSBURG AND CHESTERFIELD 

Telephone Williamsburg 271 Williamsburg, Mass., R. F. D. 1 



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